division 6

Two puzzles solved!

Thanks to Marie Beleyme, we now have answers to our two sculpture puzzles.

The large relief, dated 1829, in D39 is the grave of Cappon/Capron/Carron, the spelling is unclear at this point.

(all photos from Pierre-Yves Beaudoin, wikimedia)



In D6 the eroded stone with the relief of an eagle on both sides is in fact part of the original monument to the Memorial to the Victims of June, which is located close by. As you can see from the monument itself it, too, has the same eagle relief and you can now make out the words liberte ordre public.

The puzzle and its answer:



Two puzzles in Père-Lachaise Cemetery

OK, up front there are way more than just two puzzles to be found in those 107 hilltop acres on the east side of Paris. As some of you know, I've been working on identifying and locating all the artwork in Père-lachaise and right now I'm trying to identify two very specific and rather dramatic reliefs.

The first one is in D6, along the same line as the bust of Lapommeraye, and not far off of Chemin Lebrun. It's a unique stone with very same relief on both sides of the monument but aside from the word ordre there is no identifying inscription (as you can see one side is much eroded).

The second relief sits in D39 just along Avenue des Acacias where it becomes Avenue Transversale No. 1, close to the Turpin mausoleum and just up from Chemin Suchet.

(photos by Pierre-Yves Beaudouin, wikimedia)






Memorial to the Victims of June 1832 - division 6 in Pere-Lachaise then and now



Erected by the city of Paris, this memorial pays homage to members of the municipal and national guard who perished during the uprising of 20 June 1832.

Their names are listed on the obelisk, largely illegible today, and bodies were interred in the open space in front of memorial:

Pierre Hippolyte Aubert, Francois Michel Bellier, Nicolas Beranger, Jean Cartier, Jacques Louis Leonard Chollet, Charles Joseph Cocquelet, Pierre Condamine, Claude Duc, Henri Fauchier, Joseph Folenfant, Bernard Forest, Pierre Gaultier, Jean Julien Geoffroy, Felix Gilles, Gravet, Pierre Joseph Guenifet, Charles Herera, Jean Francois Hervet, Francois Kolleter, Jean Baptiste Ladroix, Eugene Lavrilliere, Emile Lefort, Louis Victor Lemoine, Jean Lhubert, Jean Louis Lointier, Dominique Morge, Antoine Marquez, Etienne Mathieux, Louis Menard, Jean Moder, Pierre Auguste Mousseau, Francois Munerel, Jean Pargala, Francois Xavier Pernot, Jean Baptiste Honore Prevost, Louis Pussier, Jean Raud, Mathias Reybel, Francois Xavier Sattlair, Dominique Schmitt, Pierre Georges Senegon, Charles Louis Vanherseque, Claude Weber

For more information plus an illustration of the monument circa 1840 see Les Principeaux Monuments Funeraires du Pere-Lachaise, de Montmartre, du Mont-Parnasse et autres Cimetieres de Paris (1840) by Rousseau, Lassalle and Marty.

There seems to be a bit of confusion about this monument. As noted above, Marty et al make it clear it was erected for the victims of 1832, yet more recent sources, particularly in Valverde and Hughes Le Cimetiere du Pere-Lachaise and in Philippe Landru's exhaustive website, the monument supposedly honors those killed in the 1848 uprising. And Bertrand Beyern writes that the monument honors those killed in 1832, 1834, 1835 and 1848.

A very small but nonetheless perplexing puzzle. . .

Cassereau division 6 Pere-Lachaise

There's just something about this particular sculpture -- I have no idea whether it represents someone buried in this location or is merely symbolic of the quality of a life lived. There seems to be no direct historical appeal, either. It's the movement, a gesture forever captured in the state of moving, the act of being caught doing something delicate, tender and so alive.