pere-lachaise

Dorian in Père-Lachaise

Pierre-Frédéric Dorian (1814–1873). French politician, manufacturer, and former Minister of Public Works. D70, Avenue Cail, Avenue des Peupliers and Rond-Point.

Description: Statue (1875) by Aimé Millet of Pierre during the defense of Paris 1870–71, sitting on a wicker basket used to fortify walls, with his left hand over his heart while in his right hand he holds a map of Paris fortifications; his left foot rests atop the barrel of a small cannon. Architect was Léon Dupré.

c. 1900

c. 1900

PL_70_Dorian02.jpg

2006 by Steve Soper

Pierre Gareau in Père-Lachaise

Pierre Gareau (1766–1815) was a French merchant. Located in D10, inside the division; the grave used to be just to the right of a path going up the hill but the path is now long gone.

The sculpture by François-Dominique Milhomme (D1) depicting La Douleur is quite possibly a representation of his widow.

This has the unique distinction of being the first statue erected in Père-Lachaise and is one of the few of the earliest monuments still standing in the cemetery.

The following images are from 1821, 1840, c. 1900 and 2012.

c. 1821

c. 1821

1840

1840

c. 1900

c. 1900

2012 photo by Pierre Yves Beaudouin

2012 photo by Pierre Yves Beaudouin

Bellini in Père-Lachaise

Vincenzo Bellini (1801–1835). D11 just off of Chemin Méhul, near Bosquet Delille. Italian music composer. In 1876 his remains were returned to his birthplace, Catania, Sicily.
Portrait medallion of Vincenzo by Charles Marochetti. Originally there was a female angel sitting with arms crossed on the slab portion of the tomb in front of the upright stone which holds the medallion.
Architect: G. A. Blouet.

from Marty and Lasalle 1844

from Marty and Lasalle 1844

From Normand 1863

From Normand 1863

c. 1900

c. 1900

11perelachaise_Bellini002.jpg

2006 photo by Steve Soper

Early views of Père-Lachaise

While there are several fine prints of the cemetery's early history there are few photos that predate the 20th century. Here are two fine views taken in the late 19th century from across Boulevard Menilmontant.

In the first one you can clearly see present-day divisions 1 (right) and 59 (left) separated by Avenue Thirion.

Ladrey_-_Cimetière_du_Père_Lachaise_;_vue_prise_d'un_immeuble_du_boulevard_de_Ménilmontant.jpg

In the second, taken from roughly the same vantage point, you can clearly see the Beaujour obelisk in the background, the cemetery wall and the open ground devoid of any interments as the hill slopes down to divisions 59, 60, 61 and 62,

Gezicht_op_de_graven_op_de_Cimetière_du_Père-Lachaise_te_Parijs,_anonymous,_c._1860_-_c._1885.jpg

Père-Lachaise and la petit ceinture

What's curious about this map from an old Baedeker guide to Paris (1904) is right there in the upper left-hand corner: those dotted lines that outline the tunnel for the long-gone Chemin de fer de Ceinture, the small underground railway that once linked now-defunct intra-city train stations and served as a means of resupplying the old fortifications.

My question is: Was the tunnel the reason why D83 was never used for burials but only as a maintenance facility?

Thanks to Marie B. we have the answer: the tunnel collapsed in 1874 destroying all the graves in that division and the space was never reused.

1904_plan_PL.jpg

Anyway, the map shows the tunnel running between the Menilmontant and Charonne passenger stations. While the stations are long gone and the tunnel no longer is used parts of it still exists, such as the old Charonne station converted into a cafe:

Charonne_convertie en café %22La Flèche d'Or.jpeg

. . . or near the Parc Montsouris:

Ligne_Petite_Ceinture_parc_Montsouris_Paris.jpg